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Asian Pear's Enchanting Lore

Sometimes, life takes  an unexpected turn.  So goes the story of Kevin Smith and his carefully cultivated Asian pears.  Kevin was once a tree nurseryman.  He left  the business in 2005  due to  a bad slump in the market .   However, he continued  staying in contact with some of his suppliers and customers.    One day, out of the blue, he was contacted by a man who did some missionary work in Japan and South Korea.  This missionary  came to appreciate Asian pears while abroad.  He began  a quest to have his own  orchard of Asian pears.

In Japan, Asian pears were once believed to ward off misfortune.  Trees are planted in the front of houses and gates as a symbolic guard for the family. They are given as gifts to family and friends.  This was a tradition the missionary wanted to share.  He was put in touch with Kevin, an authority on growing trees in the area.  Kevin not only helped the missionary with his quest of obtaining an Asian pear tree orchard,  he took on the care and management of the trees.  A kinship was born, and to this day Kevin and missionary are great friends.   

In our area you don't see local Asian pears much.   When you do, they usually are small and scarred.  Asian pears require a good amount of chill hours to produce.  The bugs, birds and squirrels make it challenging as well.

 Kevin uses no pesticides on his trees.  Yet, his trees bear fruit which are large and plentiful.   He has more than one variety of Asian pears.  He favors  Chojuro,  but also likes the Hoisui, and Shinseik.  All three of these varieties yielded well this first harvest.   

Kevin was in the infancy stage of this undertaking when he first met Sandy ( my partner in crime here at The Farm).  He learned of her through a friend of a friend and reached out to her in hopes of one day being able to showcase his  brown beauties here at The Farm.  Unbeknownst to him,  Sandy loves Asian pears, they may be her most favorite fruit.   Besides getting to eat a good Asian pear, Sandy also enjoys helping people connect.  

She couldn't help but be taken by Kevin's  knowledge and quickly recognized she could help Kevin market his unique fruit.   In Sandy fashion, she put Kevin in contact with some small breweries who could take his number 2 product. Perfect Plain and Swan Neck Meadery and Winery were excited to utilize this local fruit.  We, of course, here at The Farm are able to market and sell his top quality Asian pears.

It took 2 years of waiting in anticipation on our part, but we recieved our first delivery this past week of local grown Asian pears.  They did not disappoint.  Crispy, cunchy fruit that eats like an apple but taste like a pear.  

Kevin's dear friend, the missionary,  his quest is complete.  The Asian pears help bring the cultural traditions  he was enchanted by in Japan and South Korea to life.  He shares stories of their customes along with the delicous fruit. 

COMING SOON: 

 

Jumbo Green Peanuts  will be available the last week of August.  Fidler Farms

 

THIS WEEKS AVAIABILITY:

 Asian Pears (Opp Alabama)

Creamer Peas ( Walnut Hill)

Green Peanuts  Lowery Farms

Hydroponic Lettuce, (Chumuckla. Fl)

Okra (Bay Minette , Al)

Wild Mushrooms, Marrianna, FL

Red Potatoes Alabama, Florida

Mushrooms ( Florida)

Peanuts (Silver Hill, AL)

Tomatoes ( Sand Mountain, Al)

Watermelons (Florida, Georgia)

Local Milk ( Marianna, Florida)

 Thanks for looking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Japan, Asian pears were once believed to ward off misfortune. The large trees were often planted at the front of house gates as a symbolic guard for the family, and they were also grown in the corners of properties to protect against evil. In the present day, Asian pears have become a symbol of the autumn season and are often given as gifts to family and friends. The large, delicate fruits are individually wrapped in Styrofoam for protection, and the fruits with the best appearance, shape, and aroma are selected for gifts as a sign of respect. Seasonal fruits are also traditionally given to complement the Japanese belief of eating with the season to maintain a balanced, healthy spirit.

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